#review Murder in a Minute

Author: Shouvik Bhattacharya

Publisher: Bloomsbury India

Publication date: 10 Dec 2017

Language: English

Book length: 204 pages

Genre: Fiction/ Crime Thriller


When a young woman is found lifeless in a pool of her own blood, everyone is convinced that it is her college sweetheart who murdered her. The victim’s step-brothers, Rishabh and Arya,embark on a journey to unearth the truth, a journey riddled with fallacies and conspiracies, planted intentionally. What connection is there between a missing blue envelope, a misplaced sweater and stray footprints in a room. Could those people they thought they knew so well be hiding dark secrets about their past? Or did their dead sister have more to hide than they imagined?

Rating: 4/5

Review :

I am thankful to the publishers for sending me this book in exchange of an honest and unbiased review.

Okay! let me gather my thoughts. I don’t even know where to begin. I ain’t sure if I can express even half of what I experienced throughout the book in my attempt to write the review. Do I sound extremely dramatic? Well, can’t really help it. Am being really honest here. Before I go further into blabbering about my take on the book let me describe the story-line a bit.

The story revolves around the death of a young, hard working woman, adopted, unwelcomed child of the family, who through her extreme dedication to work had won her father’s confidence in taking over their company, Arora Cements instead of his ambitious son, Pranav. Esha was the eldest of 5 children, adopted after four years of Vishal Arora’s childless marriage with first wife, the renowned actress Archana Gulati. Within a year of adoption, they were blessed with twins – Pranav and Rashmi. But the marriage didn’t work well and after three years of their birthday, the lady eloped with a retired Major. He had then married Sunanda Rai and within a year Rishabh was born; four years later she died at childbirth, Arya arrived. Keeping this characters aside, we come to the character Anubhav deeply and unrequitedly in love with Esha who gave up his well off job to work in and support her company. With every character present in the house and no sign of outsider during the time of Esha’s murder, the inspector and sub inspector are stressed out to find out the truth. No sooner had they come to a conclusion that Rishabh informed them of a missing blue envelope from Esha’s room and the housemate believes to have heard her talking to someone before the day of murder in her room about eloping!

Who killed Esha? Was there really no outsider but was someone inside the family? What was the motive? What was in the blue envelope? Who took it? Who was she planning to elope with and why?

If only these questions weren’t enough to deal with, the author interestingly brings in the topic of lesbians and I very much appreciate this initiative. In the times when we readers must even through stories, under the condition of current society, this very book is a genuine example. It points out how India is yet to come to an understanding with homosexuality and how all the people, though have the right to love anyone and everyone, has to hid this. The fear of shame and disgust they suffer then they believe that what they feel is unacceptable in the society because it is unnatural and sin. They crush their on feeling in the name of disease and insanity.

Murder in a Minute is a fast paced, gripping and intelligent story, filled with conspiracy, suffering, betrayal, power and insanity which I enjoyed thoroughly. The choice of words and concepts are well thought out. What absolutely intrigued me was the rawness of the reality. How till date orphan and homosexuality is unacceptable, both by families and society. Every human deserves a family and the right to love anyone they choose to. Also I must praise the author’s talent of storytelling – cleanly detailed and quite informative. If I hadn’t already known I wouldn’t have believed if anyone said this book is a debut novel. I am utterly impressed and look forward to reading more works of him in coming future.

Anyone who loves crime thrillers, I recommend you to give this book a try at once.

About the Author:

Shouvik is a management graduate from S.P Jain, Mumbai and is currently working for General Electric. During the day, he designs high-end analytical software which makes aircrafts fly, and during the night he plots devious murder mysteries. He had brief stints studying in Carnegie Mellon University, Indiana University and European School of Business. He is a die-hard fan of Manchester United and you might spot him reading, in a café or a bookstore in Bangalore.

You can follow him @StoryTellerShouvik on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.


#review The Tree with a Thousand Apples

Author: Sanchit Gupta

Publisher: Niyogi Books

Publication date: 15 Nov, 2016

Book length: 284 pages

Language: English

Genre: Fiction


Inspired by true events, this riveting narrative traces the lives of Safeena Malik, Deewan Bhat and Bilal Ahanagar, three childhood friends who grow up in an atmosphere of peace and amity in Srinagar, Kashmir, until the night of 20 January 1990 changes it all.

While Deewan is forced to flee from his home, Safeena’s mother becomes ‘collateral damage’ and Bilal has to embrace a wretched life of poverty and fear. The place they called paradise becomes a battleground and their friendship struggles when fate forces them to choose sides against their will.

Twenty years later destiny brings them to a crossroads again, when they no longer know what is right and what is wrong. While both compassion and injustice have the power to transform lives, will the three friends now choose to become sinful criminals or pacifist saints?The Tree with a Thousand Apples is a universal story of cultures, belongingness, revenge and atonement. The stylized layered format, fast-paced narration and suspenseful storytelling makes for a powerful, gripping read.

Rating: 4/5


I received this book from VInfluencers in exchange of an honest and unbiased review.

As a child I had always heard stories about the beauty of Kashmir, a piece of heaven on Earth. I have had always dreamt of visiting it but till date haven’t had the chance. With passing time and gaining more knowledge about reality, I came to realise, even Heaven has it’s part of chaos and Kashmir is no exception. Being the borderline of Pakistan and India, though an essential part of India is often debated by the Pakistanis to be their region. Kashmir has for many years been facing torture and torment, the people are exposed to disturbing situations and suffer to the extreme. It is quite normal to see any article on Kashmir’s condition on paper almost everyday. While we sit with the paper in our hand, thinking of the hardship of those people, there’s not really many scopes of finding a solution.

Authors throughout India have tried quite a no.of times to compose stories based on this condition of Kashmir but not many have such an expressive impact on readers like me than this book “The Tree with a Thousand Apples” has. It may be because of the three protagonists and their lives.

The story begins with two people, Safeena and Bilal rescuing Deewan from a police minibus. And with a jolt we are brought many years back into the childhood of the three where we see two happy families, Muslim and Hindu, eating, smiling, enjoying life together. But life is not always happy-go-lucky. For the struggles of Kashmir reaches the three children soon enough. To a point where they had to struggle between deciding whether to be sinners or tainted saints.

‘Stand for your rights’,

You tell me,

And when I do

You beat me down

Break my bones

And crush my soul?

I nay raise my voice

Close my fist, and demand;

Or seek and desire

With polite words and a patient heart

So that you and I can live in peace

Forever, I wish;

You should pray

I choose the latter.

This little poem got me goosebumps. Such an intense, bold and challenging one. Generally when I read a storybook, if any poems in between, to me they do not seem to be much of importance. But this very poem had my blood boiling and you might thing I am exaggerating but if you read through the story, you will be saying the same thing like me.

The author has done an outstanding job in presenting a well formed story, based on true events and incidents that at some point even I could relate to. The book was impossible for me to put down ti the very end (and I have exams so…). The whole journey of the three protagonists from their childhood to maturity with time and experience has been portrayed beautifully. Though a big no.of characters within a story can sometimes confuse a reader, the accuracy and individuality of each character was written down so distinctively that I never had problem understanding.

Overall, the story is unnerving (in a good day), bold, extremely realistic, heroic and makes one question the boundaries between sin and sane. The book is like a carnival of emotions from the first page till the end. With the cover presented the richest fruit of Kashmir, the very first look of the book is the accurate representation of the thousands of lives woven into the roots of the land.

I would absolutelyrecommend everyone to read it.

About the Author:

Born and brought up in the hills of Himachal Pradesh, Sanchit Gupta began his career as a part-time copywriter with an advertising agency in Mumbai. He went on to co-found his own theatre group, worked as a freelance film screenwriter and as executive producer–fiction for a leading television network. His short stories have been published in several esteemed publications and literary journals and have won acclaim in leading literary festivals and online forums. One of his film scripts (fiction) has been long-listed in a globally reputed screenwriters’ lab. He has worked with All India Radio as a talk show host and regularly features in poetry recitals at Prithvi Café, Mumbai. This is his debut novel.

Apart from being a writer, he is a brand management professional with a wide range of brand building and communication development experience across FMCG, automobile and media industries. His works explore his fascination for global cultures, societal structures, vagaries of the world and the human mind. He welcomes interaction @sanchit421. Find out more about the author and his work at http://www.sanchitgupta.in



The standards of your perfect love were staked up so high, me being a dreamer, chose not to abide by. I could not let you snatch my canvas of existence and stench them with the thick colours of your ego and pretence. Your sugar coated words and love coated darkness were not enough to destroy the brightness of my within. I willingly broke the fragile strings that had kept us as one and became the painter of my own vast canvas. Your pitch black ink has no much a part in my rainbow filled art.

– Shabnam

#review Wheels of Wish – (Book 1 – Wish Trilogy) : The crime planned 800 years

Author: Bidhu Datta Rout

Publisher: StoryMirror Infotect Pvt. Ltd.

Publication date: 1 Jan, 2017

Book length: 212 pages

Language: English

Genre: Fiction/ Thriller


Imprisonment of a couple in the Dwapar Yug and the creation of magnetism at Sun temple in Konark has a great deal of linkage to a missing boy in the 13th century carrying the mightiest power of the universe that transcends in time across generations leading to an alleged rape and murder accusation to the story’s protagonist, an investment banker Shashank Chaudhary in 2008 who flies from New York to Odisha to find himself trapped in an 800 years old enigma. A biological allegory that unfolds a historical and mythological mystery that counts back in time as far as the epic Mahabharata. One that surpasses time and the material world with its mathematical calculations within physical elements. Unexplainable evidences, puzzling data, conspiracy theories and unheard secrets intermingle with one another to create plots in the history of time that have been startling scientists and mythologists to date. It’s now in the court room that he must face his worst fears and probably the world’s greatest held secret, a rare phenomenon of a chromosomal defect, from an unexpected guest.

Rating: 3/5


I would first and foremost like to thank Brandedgupshup.com for sending me this book in exchange of an honest and unbiased review.

I would like to start my review with explaining how absolutely fascinating I believe the whole idea of the book is. The story in divided into four parts in three different periods starting with March 18, 2008 when a woman reaches out Sidharth, a dropout engineer and qualified lawyer with the case a renowned NRI investment banker Shashank Choudhury, who has been arrested for Rape and double Murder.

Then the next chapter shifts to another period line of the story – 1120 AD. Here we are introduced to the Kalinga king Indradyumna and the history behind the construction of the Fourth dham of Lord Vishnu in Puri. The story of him meeting Lord Vishnu in his dream which lead to the search of the blue mountain.

Then we see another shift in the story as we travel to another timeframe – 1976 where we meet a classroom full of children engrossed in listening to their replacement teacher, Pariniti Mam, narrating the story of The Sun Temple. A little of mother-daughter love is seen with Pariniti pampering her little “genius” as she calls her child, Roohani.

Through Pariniti’s story we are taken back to 1250 AD, the history of talent and sacrifice of 1200 men for 12 years in building the magnificent Sun temple under the rule of King Narasingha Dev.

These completely different stories involving numerous people along a timeline of 800 years comes together through Shashank’s court case. The story unravels how the accused is Siddharth’s college friend and the rape victim, Roohani’s (yes!!the daughter of Pariniti) childhood sweetheart. She demands that the two of them were forcefully drugged and Shashank is not guilty of any charge. No one seems to believe her. How then will the innocent be freed from the jail? Why is Siddharth so willing to defeat his opposition lawyer? Just for his friend’s justice or do they share a long dark history?

Now as I have described before, the whole concept of the book is pretty interesting and informative. However, what I didn’t like was the author’s choice of words in writing. Not only the words but the writing pattern itself seems to be missing the punch of a strong thriller. Even though the writing was tolerable at first with the beginning of the 1250 AD episode it made me cringe. It cannot be classified even as erotism. It was plainly disturbing to read and nasty. After reading the storyline I had high hopes for the book but after reading a few pages disappointed arrived quite fast. Also the ending of the book was a bit disapproving with the finale of the court case appearing to be utterly stupid. The author has made a futile effort to bring together a huge amount of excessive and unreasonable information into one case and that did not fit well. What I had believe to be well researched and informative at first turned out to be just fruitless mumbling and disturbing storytelling. I gave 3/5 just for the effort the writer has put on the book and his inexpressible but vast imagination. The storyline had the potential to become an iconic part of literature but the elements within and everything else was not worthy enough to be properly called a “good book”.

I look forward to betterment in the next book of the series.

About Author :

Bibhu Datta Rout is an Indian novelist and investment banking professional and now an entrepreneur. Born in Odisha, Bibhu spent his childhood in Bhubaneswar, and most of his twenties and thirties in the cities of New Delhi, Singapore, Detroit, Tokyo. He has been working as a banking professional for last 15 years. During these period he has worked for companies like UBS, Barclays, Citi and Credit Suisse. Algorithms trading, High Frequency Trade and quantitative analytics are his core skills. He is currently living in Mumbai.

#review Fragile Strings

Author : Arushi Vats

Publisher : Notion Press

Publication date : 1 Jan, 2017

Book length : 70 pages

Language : English

Genre : Poetry

Synopsis :

Fragile Strings is a collection of poems based on a relationship between two individuals that’s fragile and with the passing of time the bond weakens and the connection seems to be disappearing. It’s about the emotional turbulence a person suffers when the love is not reciprocated back like before. The life of a girl who evolves while battling her own feelings and overcoming sadness, heartaches and dejection and how she finally accepts her life in the present and learns to love herself again as she is in the healing process.

Rating : 3/5

Review :

Poetry has this mystifying power of effecting a reader deeply both on spiritual and emotional aspects, that obviously based on the context of the poem. Arushi Vats in her book “Fragile Strings” has touched and weaved poetry in the common ground of heartbreak and self healing.

“She’s like an autumn leaf

that only wants to be detached

from the tree of life

and live a life of her own.”

We, all damaged lovers feel suffocated in the arms and memories of our failed loves and at some point desire to get back our lost will of self valuing. The poet has composed a number of touching, piercing and penetrating delicacies on every page of her Fragile Strings. Every poem works as a sort of healing and reminder to what self means and how love can surely destroy a human at time but never enough to not being able to start afresh, feeding your hungry soul some love and happiness all by yourself.

I loved the ideas and art of words of the poet. But all of it together is like a scattered mess. It doesn’t take on slowly and gradually from heartbreak to self healing. There are little bits of everything distributed unevenly all around. I would have loved it more if the book had soothing flow from the source to destination.

COVER REVEAL + Book Description of Love in Lutyen’s Delhi



Releasing 22 December 2017

• Are women in urban India becoming independent, or is it just an illusion?

• Are the young men of India truly liberal? Will they stand by their partners or

     conform to their traditional family values?

• Have the urban youth been able to break out of their class hangovers?


Fiction > Modern & Contemporary Fiction> Romance

₹ 199 ǀ 160pp ǀ Paperback | ISBN 9789386215222


About the book:

Akriti ‘Akku’ Patel and Sanjay ‘Sanju’ Saran become friends in kindergarten, lovers in college, and then

hit the real world. With bureaucrats for parents, Sanju’s world is one of power, privilege and entitlement.

Akku, on the other hand, is brought up by a single mother – a distinguished surgeon widowed very young – and an aunt who is a smart and sassy books editor with commitment problems.

Sanju’s mind is in turmoil as he chooses to abandon his dreams and, like his parents, looks to the Civil Services for what he thinks will be a meaningful career. Meanwhile, Akku, armed with a BTech from IIT, is jetting off to California, land of systems design and fun-loving computer geniuses.

Can their love survive these growing differences? Or will the compulsions of Lutyens’ Delhi stand in the way of their togetherness?

AMITABH PANDEY studied Economics at St Stephen’s College and Delhi School of Economics. He taught Economics at an undergraduate college of Delhi University and then joined the Indian Railways where he worked for twenty-four years, during the course of which he conceptualized, implemented and managed the Railways’ online ticket reservation system at the IRCTC. In 2007, Amitabh shifted to the private sector and spent five years building business software. He now lives in Noida and writes full-time.


Bloomsbury to release Austenistan on 16th December, 2017, Jane Austen’s birthday

A fabulous read this winter season!


The World’s Favourite Author Goes to Pakistan

Edited by Laaleen Sukhera

Page Ext: 164 | Price: Rs. 399 | Paperback

Austenistan is a collection of short stories by the Jane Austen Society of Pakistan


Description: Heiress and society doyenne Kamila Mughal is humiliated when her brother’s best friend snubs her to marry a social climbing nobody from Islamabad. Jamila Baig’s cold, unenterprising husband hasn’t planned for the future and all she can think about is how to find suitable husbands for her daughters. Roya discovers that her fiancé has been cheating on her and ends up on a blind date on her wedding day. Beautiful young widow Saira has mourned her husband but feels she may finally be reading to start following her own desires.

Inspired by Jane Austen and set in contemporary Pakistan, Austenistan is a collection of romantic, uplifting, witty and sometimes heart-breaking love stories which pay homage to the queen of romance and find their straight to the romantic in all of us.

Comprising seven stories inspired by Austen’s novels and set in contemporary Pakistan, Austenistan is a witty, sometimes savage and sometimes moving look at love, loss and second chances in the upper echelons of a society which very closely echo Regency England.

The writers, including journalists, editors, lawyers and medical health professionals, are largely based in Pakistan and are all members of the Jane Austen Society of Pakistan (JASP), whose founder, Laaleen Sukhera, is editor of this collection.

#review Sing, Unburied, Sing

Author : Jesmyn Ward

Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing PLC

Publication date : 1 Oct, 2017

Book length : 304 pages

Language : English

Genre : Fiction

Synopsis :

Jojo is thirteen years old and trying to understand what it means to be a man. His mother, Leonie, is in constant conflict with herself and those around her. She is black and her children’s father is white. Embattled in ways that reflect the brutal reality of her circumstances, she wants to be a better mother, but can’t put her children above her own needs, especially her drug use. When the children’s father is released from prison, Leonie packs her kids and a friend into her car and drives north to the heart of Mississippi and Parchman Farm, the State Penitentiary, a journey rife with danger and promise.

Rating : 5/5

Review :

I am thankful to the publishers for sending me this book in exchange of an honest and unbiased review.

Sing, Unburied, Sing is a book which brings in a hurricane of emotions into the reader’s mind. One time it’s sad, then hurtful, pitying, happy, longing, lone, faith, failure, jealousy and what not. It truly reflects the naked, undressed parts of a human soul. It twists and turns every inch of one’s sanity. It challenges human behaviour, duty, responsibility, ideals and most importantly, delicate choices. It boldly points out racism at it’s truest form.

Leonie, mother of two, like every other mother is expected to love her children and put their necessities first. But she is in no way near to that. In fact, it is clearly seen that she is a heavy drug addict and only finds comfort in her husband, sharing news that you all love to either of the children. It may be because of the fact that after the early death of her only brother, Given, a gruesome murder and the absence of justice done to him because of him being just another black boy killed while trying to outsmart a white guy, showed her how meaningless and utterly painful it was to take care of a little life only to one day see all of it crashing down. Whenever she looks at her children, the only feature that seems to be hers is their black skin, the one always looked down upon. Her only bliss is when she is high on drugs and can see Given.

Jojo on the other hand, finds it difficult to acknowledge his mother who never shows any signs of being one. He has grown up being looked after by his maternal grandparents while his paternal ones never seemed to love him nor his little sister. As long as he could remember, he has been taking care of the tiny human and being a constant helping hand to his Pop who would tell his storied from the time in jail. Jojo was fascinated by the tales and was always keen to know more about that one particular boy there, Richie. He always wanted to know what happened to the boy at last but was never given a proper answer until the time on his trip to Michael’s jail when only he seemed to notice Richie.

All these encounters with ghosts, both by the son and mother, seemed quite odd to me at first, since the rest of the story was very much realistic. Then it struck me that they probably saw the ghosts because they had a sort of special bonding with the ones long dead. To explain clearly, since Leonie had never really grieved or come to an understanding with Given’s death, a fragment of her mind always displayed him in front of her. She always found him when her senses were too numb to differentiate between reality and imagination. Whereas, Jojo always had this urge to know the last of Richie but since he never found the answer, the boy hovered around in his mind and thus when they came closer to the jail, his subconsciousness projected a mind formed appearance of Richie.

Then one might ask, why is there the mention of Richie’s thoughts in the book? It may be just Pop and Jojo’s minds stitching together the last pieces of Richie from their minds.

I might be wrong. I might someday find another explanation to it. I might just be overthinking. But then again everyone is allowed to interpret stories in their own way, right?

An intriguing, engrossing, unforgettable story painted all over with profound thoughts, harsh reality and heart wrenching pain.

I would recommend each and every book lover to read this absolutely amazing book at least once in a lifetime.

#review 50 Cups of Coffee

Author : Khushnuma Daruwala

Publisher : Penguin Random House India

Publication date : 15 May, 2017

Book length : 224 pages

Language : English

Genre : Non-fiction

Synopsis :

Dating is an undeniably daunting task, especially when you are looking for the real deal to settle down with. So when Dia, a 30-something woman, signs up on a dating website for people looking to get married, she realizes just how delightful, vexing, amusing and befuddling looking for the perfect husband can be. Based on her real-life experiences, this book is not a guide to dating, but rather a delightful collection of meeting potential partners, epiphanies about them and soul-searching questions that will make you see relationships without your rose-tinted glasses of love.

Particularly pertinent to this age of online dating, hilarious, honest and witty, this delicious-as-a-cappuccino book is for all those looking for love, in love or in between. With advice as sage (gained the hard way) as that in He’s Just Not That Into You and scenarios as funny and outrageous as those in Sex and the City, 50 Cups of Coffee is the perfect book to curl up with when a suitable bae is not available.

Rating : 4/5

Review :

I received the book from the author in exchange of an honest and unbiased review.

I always tend to avoid non-fictions from the fear of facing acute boredom or feeling agitated over some idea of the writer I do not agree with. But I somehow end up getting my hands on some pretty interesting ones and 50 Cups of Coffee is no exception. The very beginning of the book is filled with promises of enjoyment, refreshment and understanding. It starts with The Where, What, Why of It All where the author skilfully narrates in a casual tone about what made her come up with such a book.So apparently it was her friend, Dia’s constant search for a suitable guy for marrying and the horribly memorable & funny experiences she had while on dates which urges the author to compose the book.

I find the book to be a perfect guide to every possible type of suitorany women is subjected to face in the path of fishing out a good catch. I am impressed how casually and confidently both of the women, the author herself and Dia put forward the importance of an independent woman. Though the book is supposed to be the woes and throes of finding Mr. Right, one can’t help but bring into frontline the necessity of free speech, independence and equality for women.

My favourite chapter in the book is Mamma Mia. Though it sounds kind of edible and delicious of a topic, I say, that is not the case. Moreover, it is based on something rather sugary, one might not but fear for increasing Diabetes. This chapter is about this Puppy-faced Banker Boy, the lady’s date. Though respectable and well-mannered, he has this irritating habit on consulting everything with his mother. Respecting elders is something which comes as breathing in any generous person. But to stay dependent on them is cowardice, lack of self confidence and disturbing. One must always keep in mind, no matter how close parents are, your life’s decisions are completely your own.

I also love the fact that after each chapter, the author leaves a very interesting message and I can’t get enough of all these!! Yess!! What touched my heart was the last message floating in between the heart-shaped steams of the paper coffee.

“Not everyone married is happy.

Not everyone happy is married.”

How very true indeed! The boldness of the author publicly denying the very idea of marriage, pointing out how it perhaps is not her cup of coffee. In India and many, perhaps almost all other countries peopleseem to always glare at a woman and pass pitying remarks upon her on reaching 30 and not being capable enough to find a groom yet. They judge how her selfishness is standing between the wishes of her parents, happiness of her to-be husband and later a child. It saddens me to realise how people even today consider women to be more suited in the household and withstanding every order and disturbance from the man. I find humour, both dry and refreshing at times, pinching and poking over the revolutionary concept of equality and implementation of choice.

Would I recommend the book? If you are in for some laughing, reflecting upon own ideals to understand and breath freely, it’s a good book to read.

Cover Reveal of TELL TALE



Nearly a decade after his last volume of short stories was published, Jeffrey Archer returns with his eagerly awaited collection of short stories, Tell Tale, giving us a fascinating, exciting and sometimes poignant insight into the people he has met, the stories he has come across and the countries he has visited during the past ten years.


Find out what happens to the hapless young detective from Naples who travels to an Italian hillside town to find out ‘Who Killed the Mayor?’ and the pretentious schoolboy in ‘The Road to Damascus’, whose discovery of the origins of his father’s wealth changes his life in the most profound way.

Revel in the stories of the woman who dares to challenge the men at her Ivy League university during the 1930s in ‘A Gentleman and a Scholar’, and another young woman who thumbs a lift and gets more than she bargained for in ‘A Wasted Hour’.

These wonderfully engaging and always refreshingly original tales prove not only why Archer has been compared to Dahl and Maugham, but why he was described by The Times as ‘probably the greatest storyteller of our age’.


‘If there was a Nobel prize for storytelling, Archer would win’ Daily Telegraph

‘The short story has always been Jeffrey Archer’s strong suit and here he grips you quickly, puts you on the scent of a mystery, and moves you towards a charming moment of revelation’ The Scotsman

‘Stylish, witty and constantly entertaining . . . Jeffrey Archer has a natural aptitude for short stories’ The Times


Jeffrey Archer, whose novels and short stories include Kane and Abel, A Prisoner of Birth and Cat O’ Nine Tales, has topped the bestseller lists around the world, with sales of over 275 million copies.

He is the only author ever to have been a number one bestseller in fiction (nineteen times), short stories (four times) and non-fiction (The Prison Diaries).

The author is married to Dame Mary Archer, and they have two sons, William and James, two grandsons and a granddaughter, and divide their time between homes in London, Cambridge and Mallorca.