#review Sing, Unburied, Sing

Author : Jesmyn Ward

Publisher : Bloomsbury Publishing PLC

Publication date : 1 Oct, 2017

Book length : 304 pages

Language : English

Genre : Fiction

Synopsis :

Jojo is thirteen years old and trying to understand what it means to be a man. His mother, Leonie, is in constant conflict with herself and those around her. She is black and her children’s father is white. Embattled in ways that reflect the brutal reality of her circumstances, she wants to be a better mother, but can’t put her children above her own needs, especially her drug use. When the children’s father is released from prison, Leonie packs her kids and a friend into her car and drives north to the heart of Mississippi and Parchman Farm, the State Penitentiary, a journey rife with danger and promise.

Rating : 5/5

Review :

I am thankful to the publishers for sending me this book in exchange of an honest and unbiased review.

Sing, Unburied, Sing is a book which brings in a hurricane of emotions into the reader’s mind. One time it’s sad, then hurtful, pitying, happy, longing, lone, faith, failure, jealousy and what not. It truly reflects the naked, undressed parts of a human soul. It twists and turns every inch of one’s sanity. It challenges human behaviour, duty, responsibility, ideals and most importantly, delicate choices. It boldly points out racism at it’s truest form.

Leonie, mother of two, like every other mother is expected to love her children and put their necessities first. But she is in no way near to that. In fact, it is clearly seen that she is a heavy drug addict and only finds comfort in her husband, sharing news that you all love to either of the children. It may be because of the fact that after the early death of her only brother, Given, a gruesome murder and the absence of justice done to him because of him being just another black boy killed while trying to outsmart a white guy, showed her how meaningless and utterly painful it was to take care of a little life only to one day see all of it crashing down. Whenever she looks at her children, the only feature that seems to be hers is their black skin, the one always looked down upon. Her only bliss is when she is high on drugs and can see Given.

Jojo on the other hand, finds it difficult to acknowledge his mother who never shows any signs of being one. He has grown up being looked after by his maternal grandparents while his paternal ones never seemed to love him nor his little sister. As long as he could remember, he has been taking care of the tiny human and being a constant helping hand to his Pop who would tell his storied from the time in jail. Jojo was fascinated by the tales and was always keen to know more about that one particular boy there, Richie. He always wanted to know what happened to the boy at last but was never given a proper answer until the time on his trip to Michael’s jail when only he seemed to notice Richie.

All these encounters with ghosts, both by the son and mother, seemed quite odd to me at first, since the rest of the story was very much realistic. Then it struck me that they probably saw the ghosts because they had a sort of special bonding with the ones long dead. To explain clearly, since Leonie had never really grieved or come to an understanding with Given’s death, a fragment of her mind always displayed him in front of her. She always found him when her senses were too numb to differentiate between reality and imagination. Whereas, Jojo always had this urge to know the last of Richie but since he never found the answer, the boy hovered around in his mind and thus when they came closer to the jail, his subconsciousness projected a mind formed appearance of Richie.

Then one might ask, why is there the mention of Richie’s thoughts in the book? It may be just Pop and Jojo’s minds stitching together the last pieces of Richie from their minds.

I might be wrong. I might someday find another explanation to it. I might just be overthinking. But then again everyone is allowed to interpret stories in their own way, right?

An intriguing, engrossing, unforgettable story painted all over with profound thoughts, harsh reality and heart wrenching pain.

I would recommend each and every book lover to read this absolutely amazing book at least once in a lifetime.

#review 50 Cups of Coffee

Author : Khushnuma Daruwala

Publisher : Penguin Random House India

Publication date : 15 May, 2017

Book length : 224 pages

Language : English

Genre : Non-fiction

Synopsis :

Dating is an undeniably daunting task, especially when you are looking for the real deal to settle down with. So when Dia, a 30-something woman, signs up on a dating website for people looking to get married, she realizes just how delightful, vexing, amusing and befuddling looking for the perfect husband can be. Based on her real-life experiences, this book is not a guide to dating, but rather a delightful collection of meeting potential partners, epiphanies about them and soul-searching questions that will make you see relationships without your rose-tinted glasses of love.

Particularly pertinent to this age of online dating, hilarious, honest and witty, this delicious-as-a-cappuccino book is for all those looking for love, in love or in between. With advice as sage (gained the hard way) as that in He’s Just Not That Into You and scenarios as funny and outrageous as those in Sex and the City, 50 Cups of Coffee is the perfect book to curl up with when a suitable bae is not available.

Rating : 4/5

Review :

I received the book from the author in exchange of an honest and unbiased review.

I always tend to avoid non-fictions from the fear of facing acute boredom or feeling agitated over some idea of the writer I do not agree with. But I somehow end up getting my hands on some pretty interesting ones and 50 Cups of Coffee is no exception. The very beginning of the book is filled with promises of enjoyment, refreshment and understanding. It starts with The Where, What, Why of It All where the author skilfully narrates in a casual tone about what made her come up with such a book.So apparently it was her friend, Dia’s constant search for a suitable guy for marrying and the horribly memorable & funny experiences she had while on dates which urges the author to compose the book.

I find the book to be a perfect guide to every possible type of suitorany women is subjected to face in the path of fishing out a good catch. I am impressed how casually and confidently both of the women, the author herself and Dia put forward the importance of an independent woman. Though the book is supposed to be the woes and throes of finding Mr. Right, one can’t help but bring into frontline the necessity of free speech, independence and equality for women.

My favourite chapter in the book is Mamma Mia. Though it sounds kind of edible and delicious of a topic, I say, that is not the case. Moreover, it is based on something rather sugary, one might not but fear for increasing Diabetes. This chapter is about this Puppy-faced Banker Boy, the lady’s date. Though respectable and well-mannered, he has this irritating habit on consulting everything with his mother. Respecting elders is something which comes as breathing in any generous person. But to stay dependent on them is cowardice, lack of self confidence and disturbing. One must always keep in mind, no matter how close parents are, your life’s decisions are completely your own.

I also love the fact that after each chapter, the author leaves a very interesting message and I can’t get enough of all these!! Yess!! What touched my heart was the last message floating in between the heart-shaped steams of the paper coffee.

“Not everyone married is happy.

Not everyone happy is married.”

How very true indeed! The boldness of the author publicly denying the very idea of marriage, pointing out how it perhaps is not her cup of coffee. In India and many, perhaps almost all other countries peopleseem to always glare at a woman and pass pitying remarks upon her on reaching 30 and not being capable enough to find a groom yet. They judge how her selfishness is standing between the wishes of her parents, happiness of her to-be husband and later a child. It saddens me to realise how people even today consider women to be more suited in the household and withstanding every order and disturbance from the man. I find humour, both dry and refreshing at times, pinching and poking over the revolutionary concept of equality and implementation of choice.

Would I recommend the book? If you are in for some laughing, reflecting upon own ideals to understand and breath freely, it’s a good book to read.

Cover Reveal of TELL TALE

JEFFREY ARCHER RETURNS

WITH A RIVETING COLLECTION OF SHORT STORIES!

Nearly a decade after his last volume of short stories was published, Jeffrey Archer returns with his eagerly awaited collection of short stories, Tell Tale, giving us a fascinating, exciting and sometimes poignant insight into the people he has met, the stories he has come across and the countries he has visited during the past ten years.

BLURB :

Find out what happens to the hapless young detective from Naples who travels to an Italian hillside town to find out ‘Who Killed the Mayor?’ and the pretentious schoolboy in ‘The Road to Damascus’, whose discovery of the origins of his father’s wealth changes his life in the most profound way.

Revel in the stories of the woman who dares to challenge the men at her Ivy League university during the 1930s in ‘A Gentleman and a Scholar’, and another young woman who thumbs a lift and gets more than she bargained for in ‘A Wasted Hour’.

These wonderfully engaging and always refreshingly original tales prove not only why Archer has been compared to Dahl and Maugham, but why he was described by The Times as ‘probably the greatest storyteller of our age’.

PRAISE FOR THE AUTHOR :

‘If there was a Nobel prize for storytelling, Archer would win’ Daily Telegraph

‘The short story has always been Jeffrey Archer’s strong suit and here he grips you quickly, puts you on the scent of a mystery, and moves you towards a charming moment of revelation’ The Scotsman

‘Stylish, witty and constantly entertaining . . . Jeffrey Archer has a natural aptitude for short stories’ The Times

ABOUT THE AUTHOR :

Jeffrey Archer, whose novels and short stories include Kane and Abel, A Prisoner of Birth and Cat O’ Nine Tales, has topped the bestseller lists around the world, with sales of over 275 million copies.

He is the only author ever to have been a number one bestseller in fiction (nineteen times), short stories (four times) and non-fiction (The Prison Diaries).

The author is married to Dame Mary Archer, and they have two sons, William and James, two grandsons and a granddaughter, and divide their time between homes in London, Cambridge and Mallorca.

#review Second Chance

Author : Dr. Sandeep Jatwa

Publisher : Ebooks2go

Publication date: 5 May, 2017

Book length : 198 pages

Language : English

Genre : Fiction

Product description :

Shekhar Kapoor is a successful businessman who has never done a decent thing in his entire life. For him it is all about what he can get and how fast he can get it. He goes through life cheating and insulting people, even after he receives a mysterious telephone call from what is called the City of Justice. Ignoring the cryptic warnings, Shekhar continues to live his life as he pleases, until one day, shortly after insulting a beggar in the street, Shekhar crashes his car and is killed. And it is only when he is standing before the Bookkeeper, and being shown where his life had gone wrong, that Shekhar finally understands what life is all about. But is it too late for him? Can he be given another chance, to undo all the wrongs he has done? Or is there a chance that Shekhar Kapoor can find redemption where there had previously been no hope?.

Rating : 3/5

Review :

I received this book from V Influencers in exchange of an honest and unbiased review.

Shekhar Kapoor, a successful businessman and owner of Aerowalk, has done all the wrong things throughout his life. He is known to be arrogant, money loving, dirty schemer. He is used to get his way with women either by threatening their jobs or pouring out money. Mr. Balraj Kapoor, his father, a man of great personality was the one who had established the business but was now bed ridden, the only signs of survival being the sound of him breathing. Although ever since Shekhar took his father’s place, the company had been increasing and improving, the people working under him suffered his ill treatment. He appointed and promoted people based on extra service than their capabilities. But one must always keep in mind how powerful Karma is. It spares none. And no amount of money could save Shekhar from what happened next. It all started one day withan awkwardly disturbing call from so called the City of Justiceand receives his first warning to drop all misdoings and start afresh. But Shekhar was tooegoistic and ignorant to do so which ended up with him receivingmore warning and more ignorance and then finally an accident. When he opens himself dead and somewhere far from the human civilisation, he is taken to the God of Justice and Bookkeeper; he is made to rememberand rewatch all his wrong doings and punished for that.A long list of sins starting with when Shekhar was sixteen and was driving a car intoxicated. He had ran the car over someone’s leg and on opposing had beaten that poor fellow’s father. And it was only the beginning for the list goes all the way to each and every horrible behaviour –

  • he had demoted a devoted, loyal and responsible person, Kailash, from his work because of unethicalreasons.
  • He used his position to compel women to make physical contact with him.
  • He didn’t promote Unnati Sharma, despite of her deserving it just because he liked her.
  • He had wrongly seized Feetland Shoe Company from Mr. Ashutosh Upadhyay forcing him to lead life like a beggar.
  • He insulted an old female beggar and pointed out she would be of help in reducing the population just by ending her own life.
  • He was sentenced for not serving his father and not fulfilling his although he had thought to do so, he did not do it.
  • He was sentenced for not helping others, for selfish behaviour and for hundreds of other crimes.

By then he had finally understood how monstrous he has been and regretted not realising that sooner. He begged for a second chance which he got only because of the limitless love of his mother. He wakes up to find himself lying in the hospital bed and resolves to correct his every mistake. Initially when he discloses his experience to two of his closest people, one says it’s NDE or Near Death Experience while the other, a doctor dismisses the theory and describes it to be a mental illness.

Will he be able to turn every sin to help for the people? Is yes then how?What was the experience he had gone through in his 2 mins of death? What is NDE really? Do you believed in it’s existence?

I must say the concept of the book was intriguing. Thoughat some point I found it to be rather childish or unnecessarily descriptive, the changes Shekhar went through was quite inspiring. The book pulled out two contrasting characters of the human, one who works hard yet doesn’t get the deserved and the other who woos and pleases the boss to acquire high scores. But then again kamra is always there!

Karma is a very strong word. Some people believe it while some fear. Life is so very delightful to lead when in the bright side of happiness than under the choking covers of wealth.

About the Author :

Dr. Sandeep Jatwa was born in holy city Ujjain and grew up in Dewas, in the state of Madhya Pradesh in India. He is married and still lives in Madhya Pradesh today. Having attained an M.B.B.S. from MGM Medical College, Indore, Sandeep went on to secure a job in medicine and now works at the Government Hospital Sarangpur District Rajgarh. He has an amazing imagination and spends much of his free time dreaming up stories. He has been writing since 2006 and has completed two novels. The first has yet to be published, but his second one, which he self-published and is entitled Second Chance, is an exciting and moralistic tale of how one man comes to realize the error of his greed. In his free time, Sandeep likes to relax and spend time with his family and friends. He is also a food lover and enjoys trying new and exciting dishes. Sandeep’s most urgent wish is to be able to educate children who work in the street and have little opportunity to make something good from their lives. He believes that everyone’s childhood should be awesome, and not a struggle.